Open Access

Erratum to: Towards a common terminology: a simplified framework of interventions to promote and integrate evidence into health practices, systems, and policies

  • Heather Colquhoun1Email author,
  • Jennifer Leeman2,
  • Susan Michie3,
  • Cynthia Lokker4,
  • Peter Bragge5,
  • Susanne Hempel6,
  • K Ann McKibbon4,
  • Gjalt-Jorn Y Peters7,
  • Kathleen Stevens8,
  • Michael G Wilson9 and
  • Jeremy Grimshaw1, 10
Implementation Science20149:154

https://doi.org/10.1186/s13012-014-0154-4

Published: 21 December 2014

The original article was published in Implementation Science 2014 9:781

Abstract

No abstract

Correction

In the course of type-setting the article [1], the first two sentences of the background section were inadvertently printed without quotation marks. These two sentences are a direct quote from the paper referenced, and as such, require quotation marks. In addition, the formatting for this reference was printed with the number [1] as well as the author names. Correct formatting includes only the [1]. The referencing for these sentences is now correct. The authors regret this error.

The erroneous text was:

In many respects, the most troublesome problems of any science centre around its most basic terms and fundamental concepts, and not around its more sophisticated concerns. Indeed to the extent that everything either follows from or is based on a discipline’s most basic terms and fundamental concepts, problems at a higher level can always be traced back to problems at a more fundamental level. (Mitroff & Sagasti, 1973) [1].

This text should have read:

“In many respects, the most troublesome problems of any science centre around its most basic terms and fundamental concepts, and not around its more sophisticated concerns. Indeed to the extent that everything either follows from or is based on a discipline’s most basic terms and fundamental concepts, problems at a higher level can always be traced back to problems at a more fundamental level” [1] (page 117).

Notes

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. Ottawa Hospital – General Campus
(2)
School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
(3)
Research Dept of Clinical, Educational, and Health Psychology, University College London
(4)
Dept of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Health Information Research Unit, McMaster University
(5)
National Trauma Research Institute, Monash University and The Alfred Hospital
(6)
RAND Corporation
(7)
Methology & Statistics of the Faculty of Psychology, Open University of the Netherlands
(8)
Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio
(9)
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and The McMaster Health Forum, Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis, McMaster University
(10)
Department of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa Hospital – General Campus

References

  1. Colquhoun H, Leeman J, Michie S, Lokker C, Bragge P, Hempel S, McKibbon KA, Peters G-JY, Stevens KR, Wilson MG, Grimshaw J: Towards a common terminology: a simplified framework of interventions to promote and integrate evidence into health practices, systems, and policies. Implement Sci. 2014, 9: 51-10.1186/1748-5908-9-51.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar

Copyright

© Colquhoun et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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