Skip to main content

Table 1 Dose-response/effect-based statistical analysis ( N =3)

From: Are multifaceted interventions more effective than single-component interventions in changing health-care professionals' behaviours? An overview of systematic reviews

First author (year) and title Review characteristics Review findings Conclusion
French (2010) [8] N: 28 studies Analysis based on studies with multiple intervention components as follows: The effectiveness of multifaceted interventions did not increase incrementally with the number of components
Interventions for Improving the Appropriate Use of Imaging in People with Musculoskeletal Conditions Study designs: randomized controlled trials, controlled trials, interrupted time series • 1 (N = 11)
• 2 (N = 7)
• 3 (N = 7)
• 4 (N = 1)
Populations: physicians, other There was no relationship between the effect size and the number of intervention components as evidenced by
Settings: primary care practices, hospitals • No statistical evidence of a relationship between the number of interventions used in the study group and the effect size (Kruskal-Wallis test, p = 0.48)
AMSTAR (quality) score: 9 • No statistical evidence of an increased effect size by increasing the number of components (quantile regression, coefficient -2.51, 95% CI: -11.58 to +6.56, p = 0.57)
Grimshaw (2004) [7] N: 235 (283 papers) Analysis based on studies with multiple intervention components as follows: The effectiveness of multifaceted interventions did not increase incrementally with the number of components
Effectiveness and Efficiency of Guideline Dissemination and Implementation Strategies 208 studies were involved in this analysis • 1 (N = 56)
Study designs: randomized controlled trials, controlled trials, controlled before-after, interrupted time series • 2 (N = 63)
• 3 (N = 46)
• 4 (N = 28)
• 5 (N = 12)
Populations: physicians, nurses, pharmacists, other • 6 (N = 2)
• 7 (N = 1)
Settings: primary care practices, hospitals, outpatient clinics, communities, nursing homes, other There was no relationship between the effect size and the number of intervention components as evidenced by
AMSTAR (quality) score: 7 • For studies with no-intervention control groups, there was no statistical evidence of a relationship between the number of interventions used in the study group and the effect size (Kruskal-Wallis test, p = 0.18)
• There was no statistical evidence of a difference between studies that used multiple intervention control groups and studies with multiple intervention study groups (Kruskal-Wallis test, p = 0.69)
Shojania (2009) [26] N: 32 studies Analysis based on studies with 1 intervention component (N = 18 studies) and 1 or more intervention components (N = 14 studies) Single interventions were more effective than multifaceted interventions
The Effects of On-Screen, Point of Care Computer Reminders on Processes and Outcomes of Care Study designs: controlled clinical trials, randomized controlled trials There was statistical evidence of a relationship between 1 and >1 interventions used in the study group and the effect size
Populations: physicians • There was a significant difference in the effect size improvement between comparisons involving single (computer reminders alone) vs. usual care (no co-interventions) and multifaceted (computer reminders plus one or more co-interventions) vs. the other interventions alone (Kruskal-Wallis test, p = 0.04)
Settings: ambulatory care settings, hospitals, nursing homes, outpatient clinics, primary care practices • The median improvement for single vs. usual care was 5.7% (IQR: 2.0% to 24.0%)
AMSTAR (quality) score: 8 • The median improvement for multifaceted interventions (that is computer reminders plus additional interventions versus those additional interventions alone) was 1.9% (IQR: 0.0% to 6.2%)