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Table 3 Characteristics of the clinic settings (n = 11)

From: Investigation of factors influencing the implementation of two shared decision-making interventions in contraceptive care: a qualitative interview study among clinical and administrative staff

Trial arm (# staff participants)ClinicaSizeClinic typeClinic aware of interventions?How were the interventions used?Where were the interventions kept?
DAVPC
Decision aids + training (n = 7)1SPrimary careYDuring the appointment, the clinical staff person selected a relevant decision aid, explained it, gave it to the patient, they circled questions together, and then used it to make or defer a choice. Some patients took it home.Hung in display holders screwed to the wall of clinic rooms.
2SReproductive health careYAfter the patient had chosen a method, the clinical staff person went to get a method-specific decision aid, explained that it gave more information on benefits and harms, the patient read it, and then the provider answered any questions.Hung in the hallway with all other clinic patient resources.
3SReproductive health careYDuring the appointment, the clinical staff person selected a relevant decision aid, explained it, gave it to the patient, and wrote on it and circled questions together. Then the provider pulled out their organization’s contraceptive counseling resource to guide discussion of the benefits and harms of the patient’s chosen method.Organized in a filing cabinet with the organization’s other contraceptive counseling resources.
Video + prompt card (n = 12)5LPrimary careYNStaff did not hand out the video or prompt cards. Staff put up a sign in the waiting room inviting patients to watch the video.Both were left in the general waiting room; cards were also on each appointment desk.
6SReproductive health careYNbThe front desk person handed the video tablet, and later the prompt cards, to the patient at check-in.Both were kept at the front desk.
7SReproductive health careYYThe front desk person handed the video tablet and prompt card to each patient in a private waiting room, and gave verbal instructions.Both were kept in a private, clinical waiting room.
8LReproductive health careYUPatients had the option to watch the video while waiting during the clinical appointment.U
Both interventions (n = 10)9SReproductive health careYYYThe front desk person handed the video tablet to the patient to watch while waiting in the exam room. During the appointment, the clinical staff person selected a relevant decision aid, explained it, gave it to the patient, they pointed at questions together, and then used it to make or defer a choice. Some patients took it home.Video was kept at the front desk; prompt cards left in the waiting room and clinic rooms; and decision aids kept on the exam room desks, organized with “flags” in the display holder.
10LPrimary careYYNcThe front desk person handed the video tablet to the patient to watch while waiting in the exam room. During the appointment, a clinical staff person selected a relevant decision aid, explained it, gave it to the patient, and they discussed questions together.Video was kept at the front desk; prompt cards were left in the waiting room; decision aids were hung in display holders screwed to the wall of clinic rooms.
11SReproductive health careYYYThe front desk person handed the video tablet and a prompt card to the patient to watch while in the waiting room. During the appointment, the clinical staff person selected a relevant decision aid (or took the whole pad), explained it, gave it to the patient, they circled questions together, and then used it to make or defer a choice. Then the provider pulled out their organization’s contraceptive counseling resource to guide discussion of the benefits and harms of the patient’s chosen method.Video was kept at the front desk; prompt cards were kept at the front desk, and in the waiting and clinic rooms; the decision aids were kept in display holders in each clinic room.
12SReproductive health careYYYThe front desk person handed the video tablet and a prompt card to the patient to watch while in the waiting room. During the appointment, some clinical staff selected a relevant decision aid, explained it, gave it to the patient, pointed to questions together, and used it to make or defer a choice. Other staff handed out the decision aids as take-home educational material, and/or pulled out their organization’s contraceptive counseling resource to guide discussion of the benefits and harms of the patient’s chosen method.Video and prompt cards were kept at the front desk; decision aids were kept on the exam room desks, organized in the display holder.
  1. DA decision aids, V video, PC prompt cards, S small (< 10 staff), L large (> 10 staff), Y yes, N no, U uncertain
  2. aNo staff members from Clinic 4 chose to participate
  3. bStaff discovered the prompt card mid-study
  4. cThis is based on findings from the majority of clinic staff. Only one staff person reported being aware of the prompt card