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Table 2 Specific beliefs assigned to domains

From: Learning curves, taking instructions, and patient safety: using a theoretical domains framework in an interview study to investigate prescribing errors among trainee doctors

Specific beliefs Domain
My perceptions about my own prescribing have changed with experience. Skills
Less experience means I may be more likely to make an error. Knowledge/skills
When I have more experience, I consult reference sources less. Knowledge/skills
Behavioral regulation  
More experience means I may be more likely to make an error as I may become complacent. Knowledge/skills
Behavioral regulation  
I need to know professional norms for writing prescriptions in order to prescribe without error. Knowledge
I need to know about guidelines and protocols to prescribe without error. Knowledge
I’m not always aware what protocols are in place. Knowledge
The nurses are good at picking up errors. Social/professional role & identity
The pharmacist checks my prescriptions for errors (in some wards only). Social/professional role & identity
Senior colleagues influence my prescribing behaviour. Social influences
Pharmacists influence my prescribing behaviour. Social influences
Nurses influence my prescribing behaviour. Social influences
Everything I write on a prescription will have been told to me by a senior colleague. Social influences
Support is greater when working on specialist wards. Social/professional role & identity
I’m confident I don’t make errors when prescribing. Beliefs about capabilities
If I make an error, it will be picked up by someone else. Beliefs about consequences
If I make an error, nothing may happen. Beliefs about consequences
If I make an error, it may not have any effect on the patient. Beliefs about consequences
If I make a prescribing error, it can cause harm to the patient. Beliefs about consequences
If I make a prescribing error, it can result in negative outcomes for myself. Beliefs about consequences
If I am distracted when I’m prescribing, I’m more likely to make an error Environmental context and resources
Memory, attention, & decision processes  
If I am under time pressure when I’m prescribing, I’m more likely to make an error. Environmental context and resources
Using reference sources helps me to prescribe without making an error. Behavioral regulation
Having easily available guidance at the point of prescribing medications would reduce errors. Behavioral regulation
Having greater pharmacy support would reduce prescribing errors. Behavioral regulation