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Table 1 Comparative progress of BSC implementation in the four study units

From: Understanding the context of balanced scorecard implementation: a hospital-based case study in Pakistan

  Unit I Unit II Unit III Unit IV
I. Sensitization to BSC and willingness to participate a yes yes yes yes
II. Developing a customized BSC a yes yes yes no
III. Reporting performance based on BSC a yes yes partially no
IV. Main motivating factors for implementing BSC b Non-financial incentives:
co authorship, promotion, etc
Non-financial incentives:
co-authorship, promotion etc, leadership communicating a clear agenda
Financial incentives in lieu of clinical time released Financial incentives in lieu of clinical time released
V. Barriers to BSC implementation b Lack of interest and role awareness, access to information Lack of interest and role awareness, access to information Lack of interest and role awareness, clinical work load, access to information, designated HR, hierarchical culture, derogatory leadership Lack of interest and role awareness, clinical work load, access to information, designated HR, hierarchical culture, derogatory leadership
VI. Strategies to implement BSC c Designated HR, specialty level ownership, incorporating in existing information system processes, regular unit meetings Designated HR, specialty level ownership, incorporating in existing processes, regular unit meetings Incorporating in existing processes, regular unit meetings  
  1. Researchers used participant observation and interview notes to arrive at a consensus in order to compare progress in BSC implementation between the four units.
  2. aComparative unit progress is shown based on the three defined steps in BSC implementation.
  3. bComparative unit progress based on context, i.e., why do these units wish/not wish to implement the BSC.
  4. cComparative unit progress based on process, i.e., how do these units get BSC implemented and by using what strategies.